Richard Cordray Already Getting A Cold Reception From Ohio Democrats

Democrats in the state have shown little enthusiasm for his candidacy...

The RGA writes

As D.C. Bureaucrat Richard Cordray appears poised to enter Ohio’s Democrat gubernatorial primary following his announcement that he will resign as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Democrats in the state have shown little enthusiasm for his candidacy with some of his party’s top gubernatorial contenders openly attacking him. The Associated Press reports that while Cordray spent months leaving Ohioans to speculate on his plans, Democrats have moved on as “other campaigns are now well on their way with policy platforms, debates under their belts and money in the bank.”

Cordray’s cold reception from Ohio Democrats doesn’t come as a surprise given that his last public appearance in the state back in September fell completely flat. At an AFL-CIO event in Cincinnati on Labor Day, Cordray gave a speech described by the Cincinnati Enquirer as “humdrum” while the small audience gathered to see him speak “could be seen carrying on side conversations, and background chatter noticeably became louder as Cordray continued to talk.”

Ohio Democrats are showing little excitement for Cordray’s candidacy – and with a crowded primary field that is already launching attacks on him, Cordray faces an increasingly difficult path to victory. 

The Associated Press has more: 

‘I know a lot of people who said they were remaining on the fence to see if Rich got into the race,’ said Jerry Austin, a retired Cleveland-based Democratic strategist. ‘I know a few people who made a commitment to another person in the race, but told them they’d shift over the Rich if he got in.’

But that was months ago, Austin said, and the other campaigns are now well on their way with policy platforms, debates under their belts and money in the bank.

At least one contender, Ohio Supreme Court Justice William O’Neill, has said he would exit the race if Cordray gets in. Three women — former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley and ex-state Rep. Connie Pillich — are among remaining contenders. Youngstown-area state Sen. Joe Schiavoni rounds out the current field.

Whaley, whose campaign said she’s staying in the race, criticized Cordray for leaving the federal post to be filled by Republican President Donald Trump.

Pillich called it ‘disheartening and disappointing’ that Cordray would ‘abandon his role of protecting our nation’s consumers by turning over this critical agency to Donald Trump.'

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