Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams’ Excuses For Her Tax Problems Don’t Match Reality

Stacey Abrams still won’t give Georgia voters a straight answer for why she won’t pay her taxes.

The Republican Governors Association writes:

Far-left Democrat gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams still won’t give Georgia voters a straight answer for why she won’t pay her taxes. Facing growing questions regarding her tax problems, Abrams claims that she “never” failed to pay her taxes and that she’s on a payment plan to fully fund what she owes.

But Abrams’ excuses ignore reality. The facts are that she made over $1 million dollars in five years as a tax attorney and – while still owing $54,000 to the IRS – she loaned herself $50,000 to run for governor. Abrams clearly had the means to pay her fair share as a taxpayer, but chose instead to fund her own political ambitions. To this day, Abrams still hasn’t paid her $54,000 tax debt and her actions suggest she sees no urgency to do so.

While Abrams campaigns around the state calling for higher taxes on working families, she still can’t provide a real answer for why she has refused to pay her own taxes. Georgia needs a governor who will work tirelessly to uphold the public’s trust, not a hypocritical politician who puts their ambitions ahead of paying their debts.


BACKGROUND

Abrams is a tax attorney. “Stacey Abrams, one of two Democratic candidates for governor, has been forced to reveal a set of financial weaknesses. The tax attorney owes the IRS a sum exceeding $50,000 and has a good deal of credit card and college debt besides.” (Source: Jim Galloway, “If history is a guide, Stacey Abrams’ financial troubles may not matter,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 20, 2018)


Abrams owes $54,000 to the IRS. “The campaign said in a statement that Abrams deferred her tax payments in 2015 and 2016 because she was helping to pay her family’s expenses and that she is on a payment plan with the IRS for the $54,000 she owes.” (Source: Greg Bluestein, “Georgia 2018; Abrams owes more than $50K to the IRS,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 14, 2018)


In September 2017, Abrams loaned her gubernatorial campaign $50,000. “Abrams raised roughly $2.3 million through January for her campaign for governor, and has spent about 80 percent of that sum to hire staff and security, lease and outfit her campaign headquarters and travel costs. She has also loaned her campaign $50,000.” (Source: Greg Bluestein, “Georgia 2018; Abrams owes more than $50K to the IRS,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 14, 2018)

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