Dem Gov Kate Brown Faces Calls To Veto $244 Million Tax Hike On Oregon Small Businesses

Vetoing the tax bill "is the right thing to do."

Oregon’s tax-hiking Democrat Governor, Kate Brown, has seen her approval ratings plummet 13 points as she raises taxes and fails to deal with a myriad of problems plaguing the state, from the pension crisis and deaths in the foster care system, to crime and rising healthcare costs.

Now, Brown is on the verge of signing another tax hike that could cause her approval numbers to fall even further – this time, a massive $244 million tax hike on small businesses. Over the weekend, the Bulletin editorial board called on Brown to veto the tax, saying it would hurt small businesses that “are the backbone of the Oregon economy.”

Now, the Albany-Democrat Herald editorial board is weighing in, writing that Brown should veto the tax hike because it is “the right thing to do.”

Will Kate Brown listen to the editorial boards and small businesses across the state pleading for her to veto the $244 million tax hike, or will she again raise taxes and do more damage to Oregon’s economy?

Albany Democrat-Herald: Governor Should Nix Tax Measure 

Gov. Kate Brown is facing an interesting choice that likely will end up playing a role in this year's gubernatorial race: whether to veto a tax bill that could allow the state to collect an additional $244.4 million in revenue.

As recently as last week, the governor said she was undecided on the measure, and was encouraging both proponents and opponents of the measure to lobby her. 

She is facing a deadline: She has until Friday, April 6, to make a decision. (State law gives her until April 13 to officially veto or sign the bill, but she needs to announce her intention a week before that. Brown also could just decide not to sign the bill, which would allow it to become law without her signature.)

The measure, Senate Bill 1528, passed in the closing moments of this year's short session and triggered a considerable amount of partisan wrangling. The wrangling has continued even after the end of the session, with business advocates urging Brown to veto the bill while other groups, desirous of the services the additional tax revenue will buy, are urging her to approve it.